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Rioteers Review

RR12 Devin Townsend – Ocean Machine

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Rioteers Review

RR11 ’68 – Two Parts Viper

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RR10 Massive Attack – Mezzanine

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Steve and Remfry discuss 1998’s Mezzanine, the third and most commercially successful album from Bristol Trip-Hop trio Massive Attack. The album heralded a far darker, heavier edge for the group and caused fractures within their ranks. But it undoubtedly became a milestone for a very brief but interesting scene that has influenced many different musicians way beyond the electronica sphere. 

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RR09 Cattle Decapitation – The Anthropocene Extinction

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We are joined by very special guest Mr. Brady Deeprose for this deep dive into the seventh studio album by San Diego deathgrind wizards Cattle Decapitation. Considered by many to be the band’s best album, Steve, Remfry and Brady discuss the impact The Anthropocene Extinction had on extreme metal and the elements that contributed to this album’s influence on the genre since it’s release in 2015.

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Rioteers Review

RR08 The Mars Volta – Frances The Mute

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On this week’s Rioteers Review, the boys debate the relative merits and imperfections of the second album from El Paso progressive rock, dub, ambient, Latin, jazz-mashers The Mars Volta, 2005’s incredible Frances The Mute. Steve and Remfry discuss how such a complex, sprawling opus came to be just 20 months after the release of The Mars Volta’s first full-length album De-Loused in the Commatorium and the Miles Davis-inspired methods with which guitarist Omar Rodriguez Lopez went to create such a rich, beguiling sonic tapestry. They discuss where it sits in The Mars Volta pantheon and the mixed critical response that the album received at the time of its release.

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RR07 Type O Negative – Dead Again

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Steve and Remfry sit down to discuss the seventh and final album by NY gothic doom merchants Type O Negative. Whilst the album had a decent critical reception, Dead Again is rarely given the credit it’s due, with most media attention focusing on the (admittedly brilliant) Bloody Kisses and October Rust. But Dead Again, whilst not perfect, contains some utterly definitive and fascinating insights into Type O Negative and more pertinently Pete Steele. Released three years before his untimely death, there is an irony surrounding the album in that it’s the most morbid record by a band practically obsessed with death. Paradoxically, it’s also Type O’s lightest album, containing many of the bands fastest, punkier cuts. 

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Rioteers Review

RR06 Frank Turner – England Keep My Bones

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Shout out to Elliot Holt for providing us with our sixth Rioteers Review in the form of Frank Turner’s 4th full-length studio album England Keep My Bones. It was a record of transformation for Turner in a myriad of ways; he played his 1,000th show, headlined Wembley Arena and christened his band The Sleeping Souls all whilst promoting this album. It marks the point where a punk with an acoustic guitar from Winchester managed to infiltrate the mainstream and become inescapable, to the joy of some and the ire of others. 

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RR05 Hawk Eyes – Everything Is Fine

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Steve and Remfry discuss the third album from the perennially underrated Leeds-based alt-rock band Hawk Eyes, a fine suggestion indeed from Alex Ings. Everything is Fine heralded a simpler approach to song-craft for the band Steve once described as a mix of Foo Fighters and The Dillinger Escape Plan. The album received KKKKK in Kerrang! when it was released and was streamed ahead of its release on The Independent (courtesy of Remfry natch).

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RR04 Oasis – Standing On The Shoulder Of Giants

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At the turn of the 21st century, Oasis were still riding high after the release of Definitely Maybe and (What’s the Story) Morning Glory?. Even self-indulgent, bloated third album Be Here Now garnered mainly positive responses upon its release in 1997 and became the fastest-selling album in British chart history, shifting 424,000 copies on the first day of its release.

By the time the band’s fourth album, Standing on the Shoulders of Giants was released, critical appraisal had turned to sniping in an attempt to bring down a band who had simply become too big to fail … well, in the UK at least. Steve and Remfry discuss whether the album deserves the critical drubbing it received, the myth (often perpetuated by the Gallagher brothers themselves) that they were the biggest band in the world and the time Remfry was almost fired from The Independent for calling Liam Gallagher the c-word.

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RR03 Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds – Murder Ballads

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The ninth album from Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds consisted of new and traditional murder ballads, songs that deal with crime or gruesome death. It seemed a very un-commercial move for an artist who had two years previous reached his commercial peak-to-date with 1994’s Let Love In and its accompanying singles Do You Love Me?, Loverman and Red Right Hand.

Despite its morbid nature (or maybe because of it) Murder Ballads attracted a number of guests including Shane MacGowan, PJ Harvey and Kylie Minogue, a collaboration that probably remains the Nick Cave’s most famous collaboration to date. It even smashed his previous sales, achieving Gold certification (Let Love In attained silver) and set Cave up for what would debatably become the most celebrated (and best) part of his career.