Categories
Riot Act

156 – Lingua Ignota, Foxing, Fawn Limbs and Creeper

Remfry’s feeling very hoarse after making an extravagant re-entrance back into non-socially distanced gig-going, as he hurtled himself down to his old stomping ground of Bristol to see 80Trees, the mini-indoor festival hastily put together by the 2000Trees and ArcTanGent team. He huskily reports back on the weekend’s events and shenanigans whilst trying to sound as little like Kathleen Turner as possible. For those of a more mainstream persuasion, we also celebrate Dave’s #1 UK album success and break down a veritable feast of fascinating facts of its success.

Releases reviewed this week include Sinner Get Ready by Lingua Ignota, Draw Down the Moon by Foxing, Darwin Falls by Fawn Limbs and American Noir by Creeper

Categories
Classic Albums

CA37 R.E.M. – Monster (Part 2)

In part two of our two part look at the career of alternative icons R.E.M. we consider posit that the bands 9th studio album, 1994’s Monster, is actually worthy of inclusion in our list of Classic Albums. 

Determined never to repeat themselves, R.E.M. regrouped in 1993 to start work on the follow up to the multi-platinum selling Automatic for the People with the goal of making a loud, raucous rock record and to head out on the road for their first tour in six years. Best laid plans were severely tested in the making of Monster, as the relationship with the band members fell to an all time low, the deaths of close friends River Phoenix and Kurt Cobain severely affected the mindset of Stipe and, with the band being as close as they would ever get to legitimate mainstream celebrities, their relationship with fame confused and unsettled them. The result is an album of confusing, arch, ironic playfulness, that eschews the heart on sleeve approach of Automatic for the People for an album that is often brilliant and often unbalanced, but always interesting, as R.E.M. fucked with their own formula maybe more than they ever have or would. The critical reaction was one of confusion, the fan reaction was one of disappointment, but, 25 years plus down the line, does Monster actually stand up a great record that has been unfairly maligned and misunderstood? Spoiler…. Steve thinks so. 

Available over at patreon.com/riotactpodcast

Categories
Classic Albums

CA37 R.E.M. – Automatic for the People (Part 1)

In the first part of our two part Classic Album Special, we look at the 8th album from Athens, Georgia alternative rock megastars R.E.M., 1992’s Automatic for the People.

After a decade in the US indie underground R.E.M. had achieved a significant mainstream breakthrough after signing to Warners and releasing 1988’s Green and 1991’s Out of Time albums. The latter turned the band into near household names with the success of Losing My Religion, so when they came to record a new album they did so with the pressure of following up a legitimate smash hit. As if that wasn’t enough the musical landscape had been changed hugely with the success of Nirvana’s Nevermind, which made the alternative rock of a band like R.E.M. now the hottest sound in music. But, rather than copy the previous album or try and incorporate the sounds of bands that they themselves influenced, R.E.M. stood staunchly to the belief that their own artistic vision was all that mattered. That vision was to lean on their own sense of mortality as frontman Michael Stipe suffered a series of losses in his personal life and wrestled with feelings of grief and thoughts of his own mortality. It resulted in a record that is slower, more melodic, grander and thematically more reflective than anything that was happening in music at the time. Despite the risks, Automatic for the People would go on to become an even bigger success than any of their previous material, spawning a series of hit singles that remain staples of mainstream rock to this very day.

Go to patreon.com/riotactpodcast to hear part two

Categories
Riot Act

155 – RIP Joey Jordison, Dave, Lantlôs and King Woman

It’s been a very difficult week in the world of metal with three high profile deaths including Mike Howe of Metal Church and Dusty Hill from ZZ Top. But the news is dominated by the tragic death of Slipknot founder Joey Jordison. An absolute beast on drums, Joey changed the face of metal percussion forever, breaking through with his phenomenal chops and song writing intellect on Slipknot’s self-titled album in 1999. He went on to drum on three more Slipknot albums before his dismissal in 2013. In 2016, Jordison revealed that his exit from the band coincided with his getting sick with a disease called transverse myelitis and claimed that his bandmates confused his medical issues with a substance abuse problem. Many hoped that one day Joey would return to Slipknot and drum with them again, but sadly it wasn’t to be. He passed away in his sleep at the age of 46.

We’re also incredibly saddened to see the news that Black Peaks have split up. A band beloved by Remfry, Steve and many Riot Act listeners, Black Peaks often seemed like genuine contenders for an exciting guitar-based British band who actually stood a chance of breaking through into the mainstream. From Shrine to Glass Built Castles, from shows supporting Deftones, A Perfect Circle and Mastodon to the Brighton Centre stream, Black Peaks put 100% into everything they did and approached every challenge with their own distinctive, unique voice.

Reviews this week are We’re All Alone in this Together by Dave, Wildhund by Lantlôs and Celestial Blues by King Woman

Categories
Special

S35 (Part 2) Riot Act vs. Pop, Collaborate & Listen – Top 5 90s One Hit Wonders

It’s our third birthday, so here we present to you a very special surprise podcast with some very special guests. We are joined by Krister Geer and Dave Fensome from the Pop, Collaborate and Listen Podcast to discuss and dissect the fine art of the one hit wonder, specifically during the very best decade to be a one hit wonder artist… obviously we’re talking about the 1990’s.

Krister, Dave, Steve and Remfry have all picked our five favourite one hit wonders, and we also spend some time (a little too long if we’re honest) on trying to work out just exactly what it is that makes a one hit wonder. Does a second single count? Do they need to achieve a certain chart placing? Is it just as simple as being the one song that we all remember? We posit all those questions before getting into our choices. Some are legit bangers, some are hugely underrated and long forgotten gems, some are established and beloved anthems… and some are Remfry’s choices. Still, bit of a laugh innit!

Categories
Special

S35 (Part 1) Riot Act vs. Pop, Collaborate & Listen – Top 5 90s One Hit Wonders

It’s our third birthday, so here we present to you a very special surprise podcast with some very special guests. We are joined by Krister Geer and Dave Fensome from the Pop, Collaborate and Listen Podcast to discuss and dissect the fine art of the one hit wonder, specifically during the very best decade to be a one hit wonder artist… obviously we’re talking about the 1990’s.

Krister, Dave, Steve and Remfry have all picked our five favourite one hit wonders, and we also spend some time (a little too long if we’re honest) on trying to work out just exactly what it is that makes a one hit wonder. Does a second single count? Do they need to achieve a certain chart placing? Is it just as simple as being the one song that we all remember? We posit all those questions before getting into our choices. Some are legit bangers, some are hugely underrated and long forgotten gems, some are established and beloved anthems… and some are Remfry’s choices. Still, bit of a laugh innit!

Part 2 out on Wednesday…

Categories
Riot Act

154 – Alexis Marshall, Erdve, Descendents and Lower Automation

The heatwave continues but it won’t deter Steve or Remfry from reviewing the latest releases from the world of alternative music. In the news, we discover that Steve won’t have to get a tattoo of Corey Taylor on his face (boooo) all thanks to the Mercury Music Prize nominations, as good a reason to dislike awards shows as you could imagine. And there’s some good news in the UK as MPs finally acknowledge that musicians may not be getting paid their fair share of streaming royalties.

Albums reviewed this week include House of Lull, House of When by Alexis Marshall, Savigaila by Erdve, 9th and Walnut by Descendents and the self-titled full length album from Lower Automation. Oh and Remfry just about sneaks in a review of the Mastodon Live at the Georgia Aquarium livestream as well.

Categories
Riot Act

153 – Q&A#2

Steve would like to personally apologise to you all (individually) because he assured us last week that ‘it’ was coming home. Due to circumstances completely beyond his or Riot Act’s control, ‘it’ didn’t come home. But, nevertheless, he’s on hand to divulge his post-match analysis all the same for you lucky lucky people … joy!

It’s pretty thin on the ground for albums this week and it’s been a solid 18 months since we’ve done a Q&A so … whether you want it or not, here’s Q&A#2. Find out the shocking truth about Steve’s secret Shikari addiction, the revelation that Remfry might not think Kanye is total balls and the question that’s been on the lips of the entire music industry … do the Riot Act lads fake their orgasms?

Categories
Riot Act

152 – DC Dark Nights, Brockhampton, Sons of Kemet, Spirit of the Beehive, Panopticon and Squid

This week, Steve and Remfry discuss the ‘doomsday vault’ that is being created on the archipelago of Svalbard (just off the coast of Norway) to preserve the world’s best music and whether the lockdown restrictions lifting in the UK on 19th July will (hopefully) mean that some UK-based festivals (we’re looking at your Bloodstock and Reading and Leeds) will be able to go ahead (again hopefully). Happy days … (hopefully!) We also question the decision of a New Zealand based mother naming their children Metallica, Slayer and Pantera … naturally, Remfry brings you the pedophile angle on the story. 


There’s not an awful lot going on in terms of new releases this week, but there is a bunch of stuff that we’ve missed over the past couple of months that definitely deserves some recognition, so we review new(ish) releases including the OST to DC Dark Nights: Death Metal, Roadrunner: New Light, New Machine by Brockhampton, Black to the Future by Sons of Kemet, Entertainment, Death by Spirit of the Beehive,… And Again Into The Light by Panopticon and Bright Green Field by Squid.

Categories
Riot Act

151 – Tyler The Creator, At The Gates, Year of No Light and Turnstile

We can officially announce that it’s coming home but no-one’s bothered to tell Remfry what ‘it’ is … luckily Steve’s on hand to inform, educate and entertain, three things that we’re super psyched to do on this podcast. We also discuss why Bruce Dickinson is a bit of a plonker and talk about the latest allegations against Marilyn Manson.
New releases reviewed this week are Call Me If You Get Lost by Tyler, The Creator, The Nightmare of Being by At the Gates, Consolamentum by Year of No Light and Turnstile Love Connection by Turnstile